Westbourne Park

22/10/2016 at 13:09 | Posted in Crawls | Leave a comment
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In October 2016, Artie took us on a walk around the Notting Hill / Westbourne Park area.

We met at the Sun In Splendour, at the bottom end of Portobello Road, home of the eponymous market, and close to Notting Hill Gate tube station.

Heading north, the next pub was Walmer Castle, which we passed during the ‘Long March’ of Artie’s last Notting Hill crawl in 2012, when he put everyone’s bladders to the test. This time we were able to stop and sample the beers (and loo), and I had a very enjoyable Long Man APA.

We soon came to All Saints Road, which has an interesting history  including being an early centre for the post-war West Indian community in London and the birthplace of 90s girl band All Saints, and headed for the Red Lemon pub. This modern pub is an outlet for the local Portobello Brewery, and we all drank some very nice Portobello VPA (very pale ale).

Roadie.jpgNext stop was the Metropolitan, close to Westbourne Park station which was built by the Metropolitan Railway (and is now on the the Hammersmith & City and Circle lines). This pub does serve some interesting cask ales, as evidenced by the pump clips behind the bar, but on this night the range was fairly small and familiar, and so a few of us broke with tradition and had a keg beer, in this case Signature Rodie All Night IPA, which was delicious.

Union Tavern.jpgA short walk to the far side of the Gand Union Canal brought us to the Union Tavern, the second pub in a row named after its adjacent transport link. This is very much a craft beer house, serving only London-brewed craft beers. I and a few others had Five Points Pale Ale, which was very good, and it was very nice to be able to sit supping them on the canalside, watching the local rats going for a swim in the canal.

After this we headed back across the canal to the Prince Bonaparte, a large pub also serving a local Portobello beer, this time we had the Star, which went down very nicely, as well as Southwark’s Harvard pale ale.

The final stop of the night was the Redan, a more typical central London style Taylor Walker pub, where we drank a nightcap of Keepers Light before heading for the tube home.

We didn’t get around to agreeing the Pub of the Crawl as far as I can remember (it’s possible I’ve forgotten…!) but I’m going to take writer’s prerogative and unilaterally crown the stand-out pub in my view, the Grand Union. Congratulations!

 

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Edgware Road

01/11/2014 at 13:26 | Posted in Crawls | Leave a comment
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As the dark evenings of Autumn 2014 arrived, Artie took us for a crawl around the Edgware Road area.

We met at the Portman, formerly the Masons Arms, close to Marble Arch. It is now a gastropub, retaining some decent ales on its central bar including Timothy Taylor’s Landlord as well as a much lesser-spotted Havercake Ale.  We stood outside watching the world, or at least a small but wealthy part of it, go by. It is a strikingly urban if genteel scene, with fairly narrow streets in a grid pattern, so I take the pub’s description of itself being in “Portman Village” with a large pinch of salt!

Once Phil had customarily joined us at the end of the first beer, we headed west, across Edgware Road for the first time, past the police guarding Tony Blair’s house, to the Duke of Kendal. This triangular pub forms the wedge between two roads, and is a traditional pub, with a small dining area on the Connaught Road side. The beers were decent but unexceptional, Greene King standard fare.

We soon left by the Kendal Street door (except for one who went to the wrong street) and headed back towards and across Edgware Road to the next duke, this time the Duke of York on Harrowby Street. This also had just some standard GK ales on, and was a bit lacking in atmosphere for a Friday night.

WargraveThat couldn’t be said of the next pitstop, the Lord Wargrave, formerly the Wargrave Arms but now a modern pub, specialising in whisky, with a choice of around 200 from around the world. The beer selection it pretty special too, with a wide range of ales as well as some interesting craft keg beers, including the tasty Hackney Hopster from London Fields. The formula is obviously working, the place was certainly pulling in the punters compared with the previous couple of places, and was very lively.

Around the corner we paused for Phil to tell us about the Cato Street Conspiracy, an 1820 plot to assassinate the British cabinet, which was broken up when the conspirators were arrested in this alleyway.

Just across the street now for the Windsor Castle, an oldie but a goodie, visited on a previous occasion but worth the return, as this pub is a classic old London pub, full of memorabilia, especially royal stuff, to attract visitors but nevertheless retaining its traditional pub atmosphere. The beers were traditional too, and we had a nice mixture of 6X, Bombardier and Broadside.

Just across the road lies the Larrick, which was fairly empty by this time of the evening. The Bombardier Burning Gold slipped down nicely but we had to move swiftly on to the next and final venue to get another in before closing time.

ISISThe Thornbury Castle, just off the busy Euston Road, had the best ale range of the evening, and between us we drank a wide range of ales including Westerham’s General Wolfe, ELB Pale Ale, Rebellion Photo Finish and others – very impressive, and a high note to end the evening, though West Berkshire’s ISIS Pilsner was an unfortunate choice of name to pick this year.

Finally, it was time for the Pub of the Crawl debate, which was finely balanced this time with a three-way tie! However, there can only be one winner, so after a hearty debate and second vote, the Windsor Castle was declared the winner. Congratulations!

 

Bayswater

04/06/2011 at 19:19 | Posted in Crawls, Uncategorized | 2 Comments
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cleveland-arms-crop

On a wet Friday night in 2010, Arthur took us on a crawl around the Bayswater area, starting at The Swan, close to Lancaster Gate. From here we headed west to the Leinster (and the fake houses in Leinster Gardens) and the packed Mitre. From here, the magnificently quirky Cleveland Arms, east again through the rain via the splendid triangular shaped Victoria (check out the library room if you can) to a pair of pubs close to the Edgware Road, where several pounds was lost in a fruitless attempt to beat the Rob Roy’s quiz machine.

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