Paddington

30/03/2019 at 13:31 | Posted in Crawls | Leave a comment
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At the end of March 2019 we headed to the Paddington area, led by Paul.

We met at the lovely Victoria near Lancaster Gate, a small but perfectly formed late Victorian pub, with the usual Fuller’s fare on the bar, a classic Victorian interior, a delightful library-like room upstairs, and plenty of room outside, which we took advantage of as the weather was kind to us.

From here we headed the short distance to the Duke of Kendal, another smallish Victorian pub but a little more worn and less ornate than the Victoria, and with a more limited range of drinks. Pictures on the wall show Jack Black and Dick Van Dyke visiting the pub – I wonder if Tony Blair ever calls into his local?

Anyway, across Edgware Road now, once a Roman road but now distinctly the main commercial centre of Arab London, to the Duke of York, a small Victorian corner pub, modernised since our last visit in 2014 now with a better selection of beers for its size, which we enjoyed at an outside table.

Just around the corner lies the Lord Wargrave, another Victorian pub which has been beautifully restored, with a wide range of interesting beers and whiskies, and quality food with an emphasis on smoked meat.

Back across the Edgware Road again now to the Royal Exchange, a traditional place, a bit of a throwback to the 1990s – no frills but well-kept beers, a loud jukebox and a very friendly welcome (and goodbye) from the landlord.

Brewdog PaddingtonJust a couple of minutes away and we entered a very different environment, in the form of Paddington Basin, a new district which has risen on the site of the former industrial area around the canal basin. Within this is BrewDog‘s latest London site, opened only two weeks ago in a former Draft House, with about 20 BrewDog beers on draught, from the 0.5% Nanny State up to strong specialist beers (but no cask ale).

Nearby was the final call of the evening, the curiously named Heist Bank, a very modern craft beer and pizza joint, all straight lines, concrete and tiles, doing a very brisk trade despite some pretty high prices; no cask ale here either but a number of different keg ales.

So, our walk took us from classic stucco west London, through the Arabic Edgware Road, and ended in the modernist Paddington Basin development – a very varied range of environments within just a few minutes walk.

After a short discussion we agreed that the Pub of the Crawl should be the Lord Wargrave. Congratulations!

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