St Paul’s to Cannon Street

02/12/2018 at 11:36 | Posted in Crawls | Leave a comment
Tags: , ,

In November 2018, Dave took us for a walk from St Paul’s to Cannon Street.

We met at The Paternoster, a modern Youngs pub close to St Paul’s with plenty of space, even managing to bag a table on a Friday evening.  It also offers a wider than average selection of ales.  The Truman Zephyr seemed a little below that brewery’s average but still a decent beer.

st pauls.jpgA stroll around St Paul’s cathedral and along a pleasantly illuminated Watling Street took us to Williamson’s Tavern, tucked away on Groveland Court.  This Nicholson’s pub has two bars and is laid out in a L-shape.  The first bar as we entered was the smaller of the two, with more space and seating available in the back.  The pub was rebuilt in the 1930s and certainly has the feel of that period.  Long before that it was originally the residence of the Lord Mayor of London.

We moved on to the Three Cranes, now accurately billed as a ‘cosy gastro pub’ and previously the Hatchet when we visited in July 2014.  It has two small rooms and a small but nice selection of keg beer.

A very short walk took us to another Nicholson’s pub, The Sugar Loaf, the name apparently referring to something which was used as currency in years gone by.  Inside the pub has dark wood panelling and ample space as well as Nicholson’s usual wide selection of real ales with a bias towards St Austell.

brigadiersOur next stop was not a pub in the traditional sense but the remarkable bar in the back of the Brigadiers Indian restaurant.  Quite unexpectedly (at least if you didn’t know) it offered 10 craft ales in opulent surroundings, and was welcoming of non-dining drinkers. We particularly enjoyed Magic Rock’s Revelstoke IPA, a lovely session ale.  Inspired by Indian army officers’ mess, the dark wood and red wallpaper create an intimate rather than overpowering atmosphere.  We didn’t eat though the restaurant was full and the food smelled good, albeit judging by the beer prices – around £5 to £6 for two-thirds of a pint – we assume it is not cheap.  Perhaps appropriately it is located in the new Bloomberg buildings which reportedly cost close to £1 billion.

canning tappsMoving on we passed a sculpture to mark the location of the Walbrook river, now underground, with water flowing over what look like tree roots.  A matching sculpture is located at the other end of Bloomberg Arcade which was the way we headed to our next pub, the Cannick Tapps.  This Cask Marque pub had several hand pumps as well as craft beers on tap.  Its location below street level almost underneath an All Bar One may have undeservedly starved it of customers, although on a visit earlier in the week it had been full for a lively pub quiz.

Our final stop was meant to be The Bell on Bush Lane, a small traditional pub, but we arrived just as it was closing up at 10pm.  A quick change of plan and we moved to the Pelt Trader a modern craft beer pub, and the starting point for our July 2014 crawl referred to above.  Still a favourite with the group it was a close second for pub of the crawl, with honours going to Brigadiers.

Advertisements

Leave a Comment »

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

%d bloggers like this: