Bond Street

12/06/2011 at 20:17 | Posted in Crawls | 2 Comments
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The very first crawl of this group was led by Phil, back in November 2006, and took in the Bond Street / Marylebone area. The meeting point was the Woodstock, near Bond Street station.  The idea was that we would head up Marylebone lane, which is an old right of way in a slightly different direction to the grid.   Having done the pub walk a couple of times the main targets were always the classic O’Conor Don , which sadly closed in 2007 (although it has been replaced, at least, with another pub -the Coach Maker – rather than housing); and the timeless Golden Eagle.   It was suggested that people should bring their singing voices and thinking it meant karaoke they were surprised to see a piano playing songs from the early 20th century and even earlier!

This approach allowed us to take in unplanned pubs along the way, however the quality of these two meant staying a bit longer in each – O’Conor Don , two drinks the pub was so great, and of course two in the “roll out the barrel” pub.

After the Cock and Lion, Phil led the crawlers to the O’Conor Don, on Marylebone Lane, The Golden Eagle (and its Cockney sing-a-long!) and Gunmakers finished off the inaugural pub crawl.

The Golden Eagle is a classic find being off the beaten track yet so close to the london being – and something worth even coming back for again and again.  And so you have it, every crawl since that point has allowed us to indulge in real London back-waters the more secluded and “lost”  the better!  With our crawls every now and again your forget where your are…..

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  1. […] to Marylebone Lane, and where it all began – the Golden Eagle. This was a prime target of the first crawl, almost exactly five years ago; it’s relatively well hidden, despite being within 500m of […]

  2. […] in 1799 sold it to a three-man syndicate for £230. They intended exhibiting it in a showroom off Bond Street and engaged John Cranch, an artist, to publicize the exhibition with posters and […]


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